Advertisements

July 29, 2014

Exercise 11: Pie Charts- Data Interpretation Solved Questions for Bank PO, UPSC, SSC CGL & MBA Exams

"Following pie-charts give the percentage of students enrolled in different activities and the percentage of girl students enrolled in those activities in a school of 2400 students. The number of girl students is 1250."


1 Q) "What is the approximate percentage of boys in the school? 1) 63 2) 48 3) 37 4) 15 5) 76"


Exercise 10: Line Graphs Data Interpretation Solved Questions for Bank PO, UPSC, SSC CGL & MBA Exams

Following graph gives the total sale of English and Telugu newspapers in six different localities of a city.


1 Q) "In how many of the following areas is the sale of Telugu Newspapers above the average? 1) 4 2) 2 3) 3 4) 5 5) None of these"


Exercise 9: Grouped Bar Graphs- Data Interpretation Solved Questions for Bank PO, UPSC, SSC CGL & MBA Exams

Study the graph carefully to answer the questions that follow. The following sub- divided bar diagram gives the number of students from 5 colleges having a separate liking for different drinks.




1 Q) "What is the ratio of the number of students of college S, who prefer tea and soft drink to the number of students of college T who prefer coffee and Soft drink? 1) 2 : 1 2) 2 : 5 3) 2 : 3 4) 5 : 4 5) 4 : 5"
Show Answer


July 28, 2014

Mesopotamian Civilization

The history of the human race covers the entire period since man first appeared on earth. By about 4000 BC the accumulated knowledge and skills of the preceding thousands of years, combined with new discoveries of metals enabled man to live in urban societies. The emergence of this stage was a revolution in human history known as the metal age revolution. It led to the emergence of the first civilizations which are known as River Valley Civilizations. Such river valley civilizations were noted for the effective use of metal implements for Cultivation, weapons and domestic use.
The Bronze Age civilizations which flourished in different parts of the world between 5000 BC and 500 BC were
1.            The Indus Valley civilization or the Harappan culture (3250 to 2750 BC)
2.            The Tigris - Euphrates civilization of Mesopotamia, the modern Iraq (3500 BC to 1000 BC)
3.            The Nile Valley Civilization in Egypt (4000-500BC)
4.            The Hwang -Ho or the Yellow River civilization in China (3500-3000 BC)

Mesopotamian Civilization
The great Mesopotamian civilization comprises the Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian cultures. This civilization flourished in a region between two rivers, i.e, Euphrates and Tigris, hence the name Mesopotamia (meso - in between , potam - rivers; i.e, the land between two rivers). Both the rivers, the Euphrates 2760 kms long and the Tigris 2000 km long, have their source in the mountains of Armenia. The valley between these two rivers is in the shape of crescent and the region is fertile, hence is known as the ‘fertile crescent’. The Garden of Eden mentioned in the Old Testament of the Bible was believed to have been situated within this region. The fertility of the soil and availability of water attracted many tribes to this region. The peculiar feature of the Mesopotamian civilization was its complex character.

Political Life

Zoroastrianism - Intellectual Awakening in 6th Century B.C.

The sixth century B.C. witnessed a great intellectual awakening in various regions of the world . The reformers of all over the world raised their voice against the existing social beliefs and systems and endeavoured to reconstruct them on a rational basis. In Persia, Zoroaster launched his protest against the prevailing religious superstitions and in China, people welcomed the philosophic teachings of Confucius which gave them a higher conception of duties in life. It was an age when people in India were disgusted with old philosophical, religious and social dogmas and were striving for holistic alternatives. The new philosophy of revolt was anti - establishment in form and anti-caste in spirit. The ultimate aim of the revolt was not only spiritual but also materialistic. In due course some of the socio­intellectual movements assumed a religious form. (Example: Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Buddhism.)
The thinkers of the new movements were intellectual philosophers and concerned with life as a philosophy of power and knowledge. In India such thinkers were the wandering teachers (Sramanas). They rejected the authority of the Vedas and Vedic priests, denounced the bloody sacrifices which constituted a very large part of the Religious rituals and they did not make their philosophy and doctrines, god-centric ones.

 Zoroastrianism
Before the advent of Zoroaster, the Persians followed a socio - religious faith that resembled the beliefs and practices of Early Vedic Aryans. At that time they practiced polytheism and worshipped several deities representing natural forces, like Mitra, Varuna, Surya etc; they indulged in costly, bloody and senseless rituals, leading to exploitation of people by priestly class. Polytheistic faith and superstitions obstructed social unity, rational thought and moral life. Greed and selfishness ruined Persian Society.

Greek and Roman Civilization Greek Civilization

The history of the human race covers the entire period since man first appeared on earth. By about 4000 BC the accumulated knowledge and skills of the preceding thousands of years, combined with new discoveries of metals enabled man to live in urban societies. The emergence of this stage was a revolution in human history known as the metal age revolution. It led to the emergence of the first civilizations which are known as River Valley Civilizations. Such river valley civilizations were noted for the effective use of metal implements for Cultivation, weapons and domestic use.
The Bronze Age civilizations which flourished in different parts of the world between 5000 BC and 500 BC were
1.            The Indus Valley civilization or the Harappan culture (3250 to 2750 BC)
2.            The Tigris - Euphrates civilization of Mesopotamia, the modern Iraq (3500 BC to 1000 BC)
3.            The Nile Valley Civilization in Egypt (4000-500BC)
4.            The Hwang -Ho or the Yellow River civilization in China (3500-3000 BC)


Civilization of Europe:

Greek and Roman Civilization Greek Civilization
Greece is situated in the Balkan Peninsula on the south eastern part of Europe, Balkan Peninsula is separated from Asia Minor by Aegean Sea. The early Greeks came and settled in Greece in different groups as Achaeans, lonians and Dorians. They came from the Danube River Valley. Greece is a peninsula washed by the Adriatic, the Mediterranean and the Aegean seas. The main land of Greece is full of rugged mountains. Its crisscross ranges cut up the main land into hundreds of valleys.
One of the significant features of Greek civilization has been their city states. Athens, Sparta, Corinth, Thebes etc. were the important city states in ancient Greece. Each of the city states
had its own government and rulers. Democratic Governments were set up. The city states often quarrelled among themselves. In the end there emerged, two powerful city states of Sparta and Athens. The Athenian democracy reached its zenith during the rule of Pericles. Ultimately the wars and conquests of Philip and Alexander of Macedonia put an end to the city states and Alexander built the first Greek Empire. As a result of this, trade developed between Europe and Asia. During the 2nd Century BC the Romans attacked the Greeks and Greece became a part of the Roman Empire.

Contributions of Ancient Greece to World culture

Followers